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Since April 2020, almost half of all British citizens have worked from home in some capacity. It’s no surprise then that, during that time, there was an 800% surge in cyber attacks. That link is no coincidence – our home set-ups aren’t as secure as what we have in our offices. But with 98% of people preferring remote working at least part time from now on, we’re going to have a long-term issue.

With a potentially permanent cultural shift in how we work on the horizon, we have to start thinking about our home set-ups. There are many cyber risks out there – are you sure you’re ready to keep yourself safe? We’ve whipped up this quiz to test your knowledge. Write down your answers as you go along and check them against the key at the end. Good luck!

Q1. Which of the following is the definition of “phishing”?

A) A type of scam email or message with a fake link to steal your data or download malicious software.

B) A type of malware that threatens to publish the victim’s data or perpetually block access to it unless a ransom is paid.

Q2. How often should you change your password? 

A) Every week

B) Every month

C) Every two to three months 

D) Every six months 

Q3. Which encryption language should your home Wi-Fi use?

A) WEP 

B) WPA 

C) WPA2

D) WPA3

Answers

Question 1 answer – The answer is A. Phishing is the single most popular form of cyber attack. In fact, around half of all UK cyber attacks are phishing attacks. Being able to identify them is key if you’re working from home as your personal devices may not be as protected as the tech in the office.

Question 2 answer – The answer is C, every 60-90 days. Any less than that and you become much more susceptible to hacking. But you shouldn’t just change passwords regularly. They need to be strong too. Simple passwords are incredibly easy to hack and, if used across different platforms, mean you’re essentially handing your information over.

Question 3 answer – This one’s a bit of a trick question as there are two acceptable choices. The answers are in order of how secure they are. WEP is the least secure and WPA3 is the most. In an ideal world, you’d have WPA3. But WPA2 is good too. The lower the strength, the easier it is for someone to access your network. 

For many, remote working is here to stay. So it’s absolutely essential that cyber security becomes a top priority to ensure no data leakage and to protect your business from vicious malware.

Nisyst Cyber Security offers a managed endpoint security solution. This solution helps to protect you from ransomware, viruses, spyware, worms, and more. Protect your business today – call us on 01204 706000.

It’s no surprise that cybersecurity has rocketed up many companies’ list of priorities. The number of UK businesses who fell victim to a cyberattack has majorly increased, especially in the last year. And it’s not as if the bigger the business, the safer you are; phishing attacks worked 38% of the time in large businesses compared to 29% in SMEs.

The reason for the high number of cyberattacks? Our technology makes it too easy. If cybersecurity is at the top of your agenda, so should patch management. Every piece of current software and technology is constantly releasing new patches that add new features and bolster security. But if you aren’t staying on top of them, you are just leaving yourself open to exploitation. So how can patch management ensure you and your tech stay as safe as possible?

Why you need patch management

The most obvious reason for patch management is to keep your security up to date. Bad-faith actors will use whatever holes they can find to work their way into your system. It’s also why we would never recommend you use unsupported services or operating systems. Any breach will likely cost you a lot of money and a lot more reputation.

Beyond that, staying on top of your patches keeps your whole team more productive. As well as fixing any existing security issues, updates can make software more efficient, meaning it runs faster and crashes less. Your staff won’t have to worry about any of that slowing them down. How often has your computer frozen and sent you into a mad rage? We know it’s happened more than enough to us!

Due to the significant threat, it’s also often a requirement to stay safe. Depending on your industry, staying up to date means staying compliant. Noncompliance is a rocky road to penalties and lost business. If you have personal details for clients and they end up being compromised, you put them in danger and your business in hot water.

How to implement

We make it sound like a long process, but it doesn’t have to be. It might require more work at the start as you lay out a patch management policy, but then you can simply carry out regular scans to check for any vulnerabilities and new patches. Done right, you can push updates out to multiple devices at once, saving any need to go to individual devices.

If you want to be more thorough – which we always recommend for something as important as cybersecurity – you need to check the updates in a testing environment before pushing out. This ensures it won’t negatively affect you in any way. And when it’s all done, a final report detailing the process would help for any auditing in the future.

What’s important is you understand why you’re doing it. Make sure all the management and staff understand how it’s of benefit – potentially include it in any cybersecurity training you put your team through. Patch management can be a big undertaking for a team that’s already stretched thin, but there are companies and software available that can handle this vital task for you.

We offer a patch management service so you can be safe in the knowledge that your devices are as safe and secure as possible. This way, your IT team can focus on doing what they do best, and you don’t have to worry about vulnerabilities in your software. Protect your business today with Nisyst Cyber Security. For more information, get in touch on 01204 706000.

For almost a year now, many of us have been working from home. With the lockdown still ongoing – though potentially with the end in sight – many are still working remotely. While it might be protecting our health, we can’t forget to protect ourselves from cyber threats, too.

Right now is a great opportunity for cybercriminals. The anxiety around the virus makes people more vulnerable to phishing attacks, while work from home setups tend to have weaker security measures in place than the office. But it is not just cybercriminals causing disruption: 20% of businesses have suffered a breach due to the actions of a remote worker since lockdown began.

It is essential to stay on top of any potential threats or vulnerabilities and ensure employees understand how to stay safe. Here are three security risks you and your staff should look out for when working from home…

Insecure home setups

In an office environment, you probably have an IT manager or someone in control of the security of your network. At home, however, people typically have weaker setups. For example, their Wi-Fi connection might be WEP instead of WPA-2. This may seem unimportant, but weaker setups make it a lot easier to hack into. 

This shift could also mean people are using programs they aren’t familiar with, which can lead to further vulnerabilities. Personal devices like laptops and mobile phones may have fewer security controls, so it is best, if possible, to use work-issued devices. 

Phishing attacks

Phishing attacks are widely recognised as the top cause of data breaches. These attacks can ruin a business. On the surface, they look like normal emails. But they often link to fake websites and downloads that infect your computer. 

Over the course of the pandemic, they’ve become more sophisticated and targeted. But more than that, they’ve become more frequent; HMRC reported a 73% rise in phishing emails. The best way to protect against phishing attacks is training. Make sure all staff know the warning signs of an attempt and to check with IT managers if they aren’t sure.

Weak passwords

If something’s online, there’s a good chance someone else can get into it. It helps to make it as difficult as possible for them. Many companies work online to make work more collaborative. But too often, people reuse login details. 

Using the same login for Zoom, email, and any other online apps or websites you use to stay in contact with your team is dangerous and can result in an attacker gaining access to your accounts. Password managers can help keep track of multiple passwords and help you create stronger ones that are harder to guess.

Cyber threats are a danger to all businesses, especially while we’re working from home. It’s important to back up data, make employees aware of the various attacks and best online practices, and ensure they have the strongest setup possible while they’re working remotely. 

Put your mind at ease by protecting your business today. We pride ourselves on creating the most efficient and effective cyber security solution. For more information, get in touch with us on 01204 706000.